Tag Archives: CSR reporting

The Humility Hurdle

Here’s a situation we’ve encountered a number of times. A business owner is very socially conscious and has actively brought that sensibility into the company. It has resulted in philanthropy or sustainability programs that are well developed and in some cases examples of best practice. Because of the owner’s personal ethos, there are many other aspects of the operation that in fact reflect exemplary CSR principles. These include promoting diversity, the support of charitable causes and ethical business practice.

However, when faced with a proposal to develop a more integrated and strategic CSR plan, the answer is a resounding no. Why? Because it will inevitably result in greater recognition for their socially responsible efforts – and she or he is uncomfortable with undue credit for what is considered to be “just doing the right thing.” In an age of seemingly unbridled corporate egotism, this is almost unbelievable but their enviable humility may be resulting in a disservice to their company and the community.

Perhaps the owner would relent if presented with some of the following benefits that could accrue if a CSR program was well built and strategically articulated.

The company’s employees would be better engaged. They would feel proud of working for a company that stands out, and they might share those feelings with prospective employees. They would be motivated to be a part of CSR efforts. Productivity, retention and the ability to attract top talent would grow.

Other companies will be encouraged to adopt similar practices. This would especially be true of supply chain partners.

There would be greater social outcomes. More organizations would benefit from more support – whether in money or time. In turn, this could result in more people being helped, fed or housed; in more treatment or even cures for those that are sick; or in greater advocacy, awareness and support for causes and communities.

The company could become more profitable. Consumer willingness to support brands that are more socially responsible has been well established. Even in B2B enterprises, buying decisions are increasingly influenced by CSR profiles.

While a CSR program will focus on the company’s efforts, it’s inevitable that some of the spotlight may be cast on the owner. Perhaps the solution lies in convincing him or her that overcoming the humility hurdle may ultimately be for the greater good.

Passion Principles

  1. CSR reporting should focus on the company or employee groups but not individuals.
  2. Consider the collateral benefits of establishing a CSR program
  3. Don’t underestimate the extent to which a well executed CSR program will drive business results.