Tag Archives: csr & consumers

CSR is no longer a bandwagon. It’s a standard.

The recently released Cone Cause Evolution Study makes it clear that in the eyes of consumers there can be absolutely no doubt about the importance of CSR. In fact, the data would seem to indicate that on many issues, positive attitudes to CSR have reached a natural zenith.

In the 2010 study, 85% of those surveyed said they have a more positive image of a product or company when it supports a cause they care about. That represents no change from a 2008 study that asked the same question but in a 2007 Cone study, 92% agreed with the statement.

Likewise in 2010, 80% said they would switch from one brand to another if the other brand is associated with a good cause. But in 2007, that number was 87% and in 2008 it was 79%.

Cone’s headline to the 2010 study was that Moms and Millennials are leading the way in CSR attitudes. In reality, millennial attitudes showed very little movement over time. In a 2006 Cone study on Millennials, 89% agreed with the “brand switching for a good cause” statement from above. In 2008, that number had dropped to 88% and in 2010 it rose to 93%. Once you factor in statistical probabilities, the numbers are close to identical.

One could try and make arguments to explain the rises and dips in these numbers but it seems to me that once the measured agreement with certain statements reaches particular levels, the movement in numbers is irrelevant. Whether its 85%, 89% or 92%, it is very clear that buying decisions are indisputably being made on the basis of the CSR profiles of products and companies. Would 95% be that much more impressive than 92% for example?

There is (at least) one sobering statistic that emerges from the Cone study. Only 19% of people said they would buy a more expensive brand because of its cause profile. So, while CSR is firmly a part of consumer thought, it may not yet be translating into action. But that number is likely on the rise and increasingly we will see CSR investment translating into revenue.

In our firm’s interaction with numerous companies and prospective clients, we find many that wonder about “that CSR thing” and whether there’s just a fad factor  – a bandwagon effect. The answer – that successful owners and managers have already discovered – is that the bandwagon has passed. A strategic CSR program is now a business standard and a necessity to effectively compete in the marketplace.

Passion Points:

  • CSR is not a passing fad. If your business doesn’t have a strategic CSR program, is time to develop one.
  • Those who have implemented CSR programs should be evaluating and improving. As CSR increasingly becomes part of buying decisions, the quality of CSR programs will have to keep suit.